• Surveying page from 1967 CANCON brochure,  Underhill provided the surveying and computing expertise, this is the first time Underhill marketed it services outside of Canada

    1960-1969

    Surveying page from 1967 CANCON brochure, Underhill provided the surveying and computing expertise, this is the first time Underhill marketed it services outside of Canada

  • Underhill page from 1967 CANCON brochure

    1960-1969

    Underhill page from 1967 CANCON brochure

  • Underhill's 1968 brochure cover, photo is of J.W. Sharp measuring a distance with a Geodimeter Model 6, on Pavillion Mountain, during a BC Hydro Transmission Line Survey

    1960-1969

    Underhill's 1968 brochure cover, photo is of J.W. Sharp measuring a distance with a Geodimeter Model 6, on Pavillion Mountain, during a BC Hydro Transmission Line Survey

  • A.T. Holmes measuring distance with Geodimeter Model 6 on BC Highway Right-of-way survey

    1960-1969

    A.T. Holmes measuring distance with Geodimeter Model 6 on BC Highway Right-of-way survey

  • A.T. Holmes measuring distances with the Geodimeter Model 6 for controlling bridge construction

    1960-1969

    A.T. Holmes measuring distances with the Geodimeter Model 6 for controlling bridge construction

  • A.T. Holmes, President, Corporation of Land Surveyors of BC, 1966

    1960-1969

    A.T. Holmes, President, Corporation of Land Surveyors of BC, 1966

  • Computer programmers at Underhill's Control Data LGP-30, purchased in  1966, the LGP-30 was a computer that was marketed as

    1960-1969

    Computer programmers at Underhill's Control Data LGP-30, purchased in 1966, the LGP-30 was a computer that was marketed as "Small Size...Mobile", and having a "Large Memory", it weighed 800 lbs and had a 4096 word magnetic drum memory

  • J.M. Parnell measuring distances with a Tellurometer MRA3 for a control survey in the Lower Mainland of BC, the MRA3 was a long range  microwave instrument, Little Mountain, Vancouver

    1960-1969

    J.M. Parnell measuring distances with a Tellurometer MRA3 for a control survey in the Lower Mainland of BC, the MRA3 was a long range microwave instrument, Little Mountain, Vancouver

  • J.W. Sharpe on Hydro Transmission Line Survey, Pavillion Mountain, near Lillooet, with Geodimeter Model 6

    1960-1969

    J.W. Sharpe on Hydro Transmission Line Survey, Pavillion Mountain, near Lillooet, with Geodimeter Model 6

  • T.E. Koepke operating the LGP-30, computer time was charged by the minute hence the darkroom timer

    1960-1969

    T.E. Koepke operating the LGP-30, computer time was charged by the minute hence the darkroom timer

  • A.T. Holmes instructing W.G. Robinson on the operation of the LGP-30

    1960-1969

    A.T. Holmes instructing W.G. Robinson on the operation of the LGP-30

  • W.G. Robinson with Tellurometer MRA3, on photo control survey in BC

    1960-1969

    W.G. Robinson with Tellurometer MRA3, on photo control survey in BC

  • Hiller helicopter landing in the Mountains,  Helicopters revolutionized mountain control surveys in BC

    1960-1969

    Hiller helicopter landing in the Mountains, Helicopters revolutionized mountain control surveys in BC

1960–1969

The 1960s marked the start of great technological change in the Surveying field and Underhill was there. Electronic distance measurement (EDM) instruments and computers forever changed how surveys would be done. Computations, once arduous, could be completed quickly and accurately. Massive distances could be measured in minutes instead of days and at unheard of precision. As an early adopter of the new technology, Underhill provided EDM services and computation services to dozens of Land Surveyors throughout BC and Alberta into the 1970s. Additionally, a number of lower mainland bridge crossings were surveyed with the new Geodimeter technology including Port Mann, New 2nd Narrows, Arthur Lang and Mission. Numerous BC Hydro transmission line surveys were also conducted.

Major developments surveyed included Bentall One and Bentall Two at Bentall Centre and Granville Square – Project 200.

A major project during the 60s was the survey of the Kaiser Coal Development from Fernie to Sparwood and through to Elkford. Legal surveys of all of the coal lands took twenty to thirty people two years to complete.

Milestones

1961

Former employees, J.M. Parnell and J.W. Sharpe, leave Underhill and form Sharpe & Parnell Land Surveyors.

1962

Underhill purchases a Geodimeter Model 4 electronic distance measurement (EDM) instrument. The first in Western Canada, it weighs 35 lbs and runs off a car battery. It can measure a distance of up to three miles in ten minutes (plus additional calculation time).

1964

Clare and Jim retire from the partnership they founded and are awarded Life Membership in the Corporation of Land Surveyors of BC.[10] They also become Life Members in the Association of Professional Engineers of BC. Underhill & Underhill and Sharpe & Parnell merge to practice as Underhill & Underhill. Geodimeter introduces the Model 6 EDM.

1966

A.T. Holmes is elected president of the Corporation of Land Surveyors of BC.[10] Underhill Engineering Co. Ltd. is incorporated. The office moves to 597 Burrard St., Vancouver, in a building shared with Dominion Construction Co. Ltd. Underhill purchases its first computer—a Control Data LGP-30. It is a vacuum tube monster with a mere 4096 word, magnetic drum memory. Today, this same computer is on display at MacDonald Dettwiler in Richmond. Decades before the advent of the Internet, field data were being entered and sent via Telex to Vancouver where paper tapes of the data would be fed from the Telex into the LGP-30 for processing. The results would be printed onto paper tape and Telexed back to the crews in the field. Underhill also provided computing services to numerous survey firms and local governments in BC and Alberta.

1967

Underhill Engineering Co. Ltd. becomes a partner in CANCON Engineering Services Ltd., a consortium of Western Canadian consulting engineering firms set up to execute overseas engineering assignments. T.L. Jones, BCLS (#376), becomes a partner.

1968

T.E. Koepke, P.Eng., and D.T. Simmons obtain their commissions as BCLS.[10]

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