• Brunsviga Midget MA, a portable hand crank calculator, ca. 1910-1927

    1920-1929

    Brunsviga Midget MA, a portable hand crank calculator, ca. 1910-1927

  • The

    1920-1929

    The "Improved Willis Planimeter", a mechanical integrator used to measure areas on plans, planimeters were used up to the 1980's, ca. 1901

  • The Metropolitan Building at 837 W. Hastings St. was the office of Underhill & Underhill from 1919 to 1921, City of Vancouver Archives, Bu N339

    1920-1929

    The Metropolitan Building at 837 W. Hastings St. was the office of Underhill & Underhill from 1919 to 1921, City of Vancouver Archives, Bu N339

  • Detail from triangulation survey showing the trigonometric heighting of Mystery Mountain (Mt. Waddington) of 13,260 ft., J.T. Underhill, 1927

    1920-1929

    Detail from triangulation survey showing the trigonometric heighting of Mystery Mountain (Mt. Waddington) of 13,260 ft., J.T. Underhill, 1927

  • Part of triangulation survey of Kinakline River Valley at the head of Knight Inlet showing topography and Mystery Mtn.,  J.T. Underhill, 11Tu287, 1927

    1920-1929

    Part of triangulation survey of Kinakline River Valley at the head of Knight Inlet showing topography and Mystery Mtn., J.T. Underhill, 11Tu287, 1927

  • Triangulation survey of Underhill Island, J.T. Underhill,  2Tu251, 1921

    1920-1929

    Triangulation survey of Underhill Island, J.T. Underhill, 2Tu251, 1921

  • The Williams Building at 413 Granville St., Vancouver, Underhill office from 1922 to 1956, view looking down Hastings St., City of Vancouver Archives, Bu P646.2

    1920-1929

    The Williams Building at 413 Granville St., Vancouver, Underhill office from 1922 to 1956, view looking down Hastings St., City of Vancouver Archives, Bu P646.2

  • The Williams Building at 413 Granville St., Vancouver, Underhill office from 1922 to 1956, view looking down Granville St., City of Vancouver Archives, CVA 1399-389

    1920-1929

    The Williams Building at 413 Granville St., Vancouver, Underhill office from 1922 to 1956, view looking down Granville St., City of Vancouver Archives, CVA 1399-389

1920–1929

Throughout the 1920s, J.T. Underhill spent his summers doing triangulation surveys along the mid-coast and in the mountains of BC. In the early 1920s, J.T. named numerous geographic features (Islands, Bays, Inlets, Channels, etc.) in BC after family members, crew members, and others. Many of the names are officially in use today, including Underhill Island, Clare Island, and Lewall Inlet. Both of the Underhill brothers were heavily involved in mineral claims and mining surveys during this period.

Milestones

1920

Clare and J.T. are designated as Professional Engineers Civil with the new Association of Professional Engineers of BC. The office is located at the Metropolitan Building, 314 - 837 W. Hastings, Vancouver.

1921

Clare and J.T. Underhill obtain their commissions as Dominion Land Surveyors (DLS).

1922

Horace McNaughton Fraser obtains a commission as a BCLS (#228). Horace started his survey career with William Bolton Rimmer, BCLS (#156) in Atlin.[56] He was articled to Edward Stephen Wilkinson, LS.[56][57] Horace was a professional mining engineer who grew up in Atlin and Vancouver, BC.[14] His father (J.A. Fraser) was the Gold Commissioner and Government Agent (1902–1922) for Atlin after the Atlin gold rush.[15][16] Horace goes into partnership with Clare and J.T. The company is renamed Underhill, Underhill & Fraser. The office moves to the Williams Building, 27 - 413 Granville St., Vancouver.[17]

1926–1929

Horace McNaughton Fraser operates an office in Atlin, BC.[17] Clare occasionally travels north over the Dominion Government Telegraph Trail by horseback from Telegraph Creek on the Stikine to work with Horace in the summers.[18]

1927

Jim Underhill trigonometrically levels the Mystery Mountain during a triangulation survey of the Klinakline River Valley. The height he surveys of 13,260 feet establishes it as the highest peak in British Columbia.[19] Following this, it is named Mount Waddington.

1929

The first recorded ascents of Whitecap Mountain (2918 metres) and Birkenhead Peak (2506 metres) are credited to a J.T. Underhill topographic survey. In October, the stock market crash on Wall Street brings an end to the Roaring Twenties and the beginning of the Great Depression.

Read More